Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

American History 110: Find Articles, Reports & Documents

Resources for Mrs. Fordham's History course

Why Use Journal Articles?

Use journal articles to find in-depth information on a specific topic.  They are usually more current than books.  Articles from academic journals are often peer reviewed.

Why Use Newspaper Articles?

Newspaper Articles generally:

  • convey information about a current event, incident, people, places or issues of public interest.
  • contain personal opinions on a topic

Know the Difference

Article: Articles are the individual "stories" published in a newspaper, magazine, or journal. For example, the story about the Rangers published in Sports Illustrated is an article.

Journal: Journals contain several articles published about a specific subject area and are typically scholarly. For example, the article about stem cells was published in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

Database: Databases index millions of articles published in thousands of newspapers, magazines, and journals. There are databases that index sources from many different discipline areas, while others are subject specific. For example, the New York Times can be accessed by searching the database Lexis Nexis Academic.

Types of Sources

Popular: Sources published in newspapers and magazines intended for general audience. 

Scholarly: Well researched sources that have been written for scholars, students, and experts in the discipline area.

Peer Reviewed: Articles that have been evaluated by other professionals in the field to check for accuracy and adherence to disciplinary standards.

Database Search Tips

Use Boolean Logic (AND, OR, NOT) to combine search concepts.

 

TOO FEW hits: OR to add synonyms; individual key words, NOT whole phrases; drop concept(s) with AND; truncate; consider other databases.

 

TOO MANY hits:  AND another concept into search; use other available limiters in the database.

 

Truncation symbols (?, *, !, +) will provide variant spelling after the root word. 

 

A wildcard (?, *) is a character that may be used in a search term to represent one or more other characters.

Do an advanced search and take advantage of the fields provided.

Use the subject headings/descriptors to find additional citations on your topic.  If that does not work, use the keyword search.

You can also use limits (e.g., publication year, language, words in the title, etc.) to narrow your retrieval. 
 
Set up an auto alert/RSS feed to monitor the research.  

Spiva Library Individual Databases to Search

LexisNexis Academic

LexisNexis® Academic

Search News on LexisNexis Academic

About LexisNexis|Terms and Conditions|Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2012 LexisNexis, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

What is a Scholarly or Peer Review Article

North Carolina State University Libraries explains the peer review process and its significance in research.

This site is maintained by the librarians of George A. Spiva Library.
If you have a question or comment about the Library's LibGuides, please contact the site administrator.